He Was Always “Sir Ringo” to Us!

By Jude Southerland Kessler and members of our Fest family


Sir Ringo Starr. Sir Richard Starkey. Either way, it has a lovely (Dare I say it?) ring to it! And there’s an appendage that seems to be attached to the title, whenever a Beatles fan utters it. It goes like this, “Sir Richard Starkey, About Damn Time.” Right?


For ages, those of us in the Beatles world have held our Ring in the highest esteem and have always known him to be rock’n’roll royalty. And our reasons for placing him in the category of “The Elite” are as many and varied as there are fans. Let’s hear from a few special people in our Fest for Beatles Fans family and discover what they remember most and best about Sir Ringo:


From David Bedford of The Dingle (where Ringo grew up) area of Liverpool and author of the upcoming book Finding The Fourth Beatle:


Ringo was the first Beatle I knew about as I grew up in the Dingle near Madryn Street where he was born, and I attended the same primary school, St. Silas that he had. The Dingle was a tough place to live back in the 40s and 50s.


He had such a hard childhood, with his father leaving home when Richy was only 3. He then nearly died from illness at the age of 7, missed a lot of school, contracted tuberculosis at 13 and was so ill. And yet, he emerged from this backdrop of adversity to become one of the most respected drummers of all time, and not just because he was a Beatle!


Having studied his drumming for my new book Finding the Fourth Beatle, I can now truly appreciate what he contributed to The Beatles and their sound. 


Don’t let anyone tell you he was lucky. He wasn’t! Finally he is getting the recognition he deserves. Arise, Sir Richy of Dingle.


From our fearless leader, Mr. Mark Lapidos, founder of The Fest for Beatles Fans:


What’s my favorite Sir Ringo Moment? Well, ‘I’m a Mocker’ does it for me! Also, on Ringo’s 70th birthday when Paul surprised him. Ringo ran and then sort of leaped onto his kit to join his ‘brother’ for “Birthday.” A most magical moment!”


From Nicole Michael of 910 Public Relations (a lifelong Ringo fan):


Sir Ringo is not afraid to be authentic. In several well-known interviews, he cries. I love a sentimentalist, and can totally relate to his just letting the emotions flow. He’s not dictated by a PR machine, he is himself. This is not more obvious than in his Twitter feed (by the way, everyone should read this article on the 19 reasons you should be following Ringo on Twitter!). A lot of people say Ringo was just lucky, but I say not only is he very talented, he is also honest and grateful.”


From author, Lanea Stagg, of The Recipe Records Series, including Recipe Records: A Tribute to The Beatles:


My mother should know. She always told me that Ringo was the Beatle that ALL the girls loved when the boys invaded America! Ringo’s one liners, or Ringo-isms, endeared him to his brothers John, Paul and George. They presented his charming phrases to the world: “tomorrow never knows,” “eight days a week” and “a hard day’s night!” The many interviews I’ve seen with Ring have only cemented the fact that he was genuine and loving and wished for love and peace. It is impossible not to love that “bundle of joy!”  


From Danny Abriano, who keeps our Fest for Beatles Fans social media and website running smoothly, and helps plan each Fest — including booking the Apple Jam Stage:


My favorite Ringo moment was being at his 70th birthday at Radio City when Paul showed up and the two of them played “Birthday” together! After Ringo’s set was over, I noticed a stagehand run out and place Paul’s iconic bass in the middle of the stage. I turned to the person I was with and let them know what was about to happen, even though I couldn’t quite believe it. Within seconds, Paul ran out, the place went ballistic (it was literally shaking), Ringo came back out and ran to his kit, and the song started, with Paul belting it out as if it was 1968. It was an unreal experience. For someone my age (I was born in 1983), seeing two Beatles playing together live was something I didn’t think I’d ever witness.


From Marti Edwards, author of 16 in 64: The Beatles and The Baby Boomers:


My most precious memory of Ringo was during their 1964 Press Conference in Chicago.  I was 16 years old then and our Beatles Fan Club was in attendance to present a plaque to the Beatles. When they entered the room, the press ran to take photos and ask questions. By the time we reached that side of the room, the Beatles were already talking to reporters. Peering over heads, I caught a glimpse of George, John and Paul, but didn’t see Ringo. I asked my friend where the heck was Ringo. The fellow standing directly in front of me turned and said, “Here I am darling” and gave me a hug.  I almost fainted…It was Ringo!  Thank you for the wonderful Ringo moment.  Big hugs to you, Ringo, fifty-four years later.


From Al Sussman, author of Changin’ Times: 101 Days That Shaped a Generation and lifelong Fest Family member:


Ringo was the final piece of the puzzle, transforming The Beatles from a popular Merseyside band to the group that changed the course of music history. If you need proof, watch Ringo playing like a man possessed for The Beatles’ first American concert and saying afterward, “I could have played for this crowd for hours!”


From Sara Schmidt, author of Happiness is Seeing The Beatles: Beatlemania in St. Louis:


As a Second Generation Beatles fan, I grew up with a Ringo loving mom. My mom, Coral, has loved Ringo Starr from the moment she first saw him on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1964. Throughout my life, I have always heard the praises of Ringo. (How he is the best drummer, sings the songs so much better than the cover versions of them, he is the funniest, the nicest, and the cutest.) And while I am a John girl myself, I have always had a soft spot for Ringo because my mom has always loved him. My favorite Ringo memory was when my mom and I saw Ringo in concert in 2014. We had great seats, 4th row center. At the last Fest that we had attended, my mom had bought a T-shirt from Mark Hudson that said, “Ringo Rocks!” In the middle of singing “Yellow Submarine,” Ringo noticed my mom’s shirt and made a motion across his chest to signal that he had read the shirt and then gave a “thumbs up.” My mom was thrilled beyond belief! Ringo actually noticed her 50 years after she first noticed him! I think it is great how Ringo goes out of his way at his concerts to wave or give a peace sign to as many fans in the audience that he can. As my mom’s shirt said – Ringo Rocks!  


From Jim Berkenstadt, the Rock’n’Roll Detective and author of The Beatle Who Vanished, the story of Jimmie Nicol:


For me, meeting Ringo was a big moment. I was invited to the Vegas premier of The Beatles “Love” show by Neil Aspinall. (I had worked on the show project.) 


At The Beatles After Party, I was chatting with Jim Keltner and John Densmore (drummer for The Doors). Ringo came up to say hello (to the drummers, not me. LOL) He said something like, “Oh, I didn’t know we were having a drummers’ convention.” I said to Jim Keltner, “I must have died and gone to drummer’s heaven!” Keltner is a fan too, so he understands. It was just a nice, relaxed chat. I just got to hang, say hello, and mostly listen to these amazing musicians. Needless to say we all talked about how much we loved the show.


From Tom Frangione, co-host of the Fab Fourum on Sirius XM Radio and lifelong Fest Family member:


Generally, my favorite thing about Ringo is the nearly 30-year running All Starr Band franchise. Got to see so many musicians I might not have ever gotten out to catch in concert. Seeing Ringo play so many styles of music and jam with the likes of Joe Walsh, Dave Edmunds, Felix Cavaliere, Billy Preston, Peter Frampton, and so many more has made for so many great memories!


BEST MOMENT – 7/7/2010 – All Starr’s do a concert on Ringo’s 70th birthday and Paul shows up to play – what else – “Birthday”! Place went crazy – TOTAL BEATLEMANIA!!!!


From Dr. Kit O’Toole, author of Songs We Were Singing: Guided Tours Through The Beatles Lesser Known Tracks:


Ringo’s showmanship as a solo artist has grown more and more electric. I remember the Grammy Awards Salute to the Beatles TV special—when he bounded onstage to perform his solo spot, he OWNED that room. Wearing a radiant smile, Ringo ran up and down the stage, leading the ecstatic audience in singalongs and infusing the room with joy. Seeing an over 75-year old enthrall an audience of all ages?  THAT’S an inspiration.


From Ken Womack, author of Maximum Volume: The Life of Beatles Producer Sir George Martin, Vol. 1:


My favorite memory involves George Martin, who always felt bad about the way Ringo was welcomed into EMI Studios in the wake of Pete Best’s ouster and the manifestation of studio drummer Andy White. Years later, George would note that Ringo never complained in the studio, working for hours on end behind his kit as the others worked out their ideas, only making a small handful of errors in all of that time. It’s an astounding record, really, and a great tribute to Ringo’s sense of his craft.


From Susan Derbacher, lifelong Fest Family member and illustrator for Vol. 4 in The John Lennon Series, Should Have Known Better:


One of my favorite Ringo quotes/comments is taken from an interview years ago: “First and foremost I am a drummer. After that I am other things.” In his self-effacing way, Ringo reveals what he hopes will be his legacy unaware at the time perhaps of the huge impact and imprint he and his band mates had left on the world. Everlasting indeed! A perfect example of this was witnessed the first time I saw Ringo live with his first All-Starr Band in 1989. Elated to see a Beatle in concert for the very first time (my 2nd being Paul in July 1990), I was struck at how he was simply just a part of the band. (Front and center when needed, but happy to be nicely tucked behind his kit as he transferred the spotlight to the other band members as they sang and soloed through their hits.) I have seen several incarnations of the All-Starrs through the years, and it is always an evening to sit back and enjoy an evening of Peace, Love, great music, and incredible moments. Sir Richard Starkey: a great drummer and humanitarian…and always unforgettable!


From Jacob Michael, Chicago Fest family member and editor for The John Lennon Series:


My favorite Ringo memory is probably seeing him on-screen for the first time in A Hard Day’s Night. I was only 11 years old and already a fan of Monty Python’s Flying Circus and that style of British humor, so I fell in love with The Beatles’ display of wit and their constant one-liners in that film. And I remember thinking that Ringo in particular had such a wonderfully dry and droll sense of humor. To this day I find myself randomly quoting his lines from that film: “She’ll only reject me in the end, and I’ll be frus-trated”; “hiding behind a smokescreen of bourgeois cliches!”; “well if he’s your grandfather, who knows, hahahahah!”


From Jerry Hammack, author of The Beatles Recording Reference Manual:


It’s 1967 in the pine paneled, shag carpeted rec room of my grandmother’s house in the south end of Seattle. She had let me stay up late because the midnight matinee on channel 4 was A Hard Day’s Night and she knows how much I love The Beatles. So, I’m camped a couple inches from that glorious 20″ black and white cathode ray tube, and there’s Ringo, making me laugh while he rocks my cowpoke pj’s off – with his hideous great hooter, and his poor little head, trembling under the weight of it! To this day, he still rocks me and he makes me laugh. 


Finally, from Suzie Duchateau, Chicago Fest family member:


I think socially/emotionally, Ringo made out the best of the four. Being an only child and spending many years “in hospital” as a youngster, I think he found a band of brothers in the other three – an instant family. As he missed much schooling in his formative years because of his health, he was not extremely “book smart,” and I think he could come off as a bit unfriendly to outsiders and let the others do the talking a lot. With the Beatles, however, he knew he was never judged and wasn’t made to feel that he didn’t measure up. He could just be himself and not think before he spoke. He was with family.  


Ringo, you are still with family, but these days, the family is quite large: worldwide. From Michael Quinn in Italy to Gabor Peterdi in Hungary to Adam Forrest in California, we love you and are so very proud. We read Dave Bedford’s words and tear up because we, too, feel a part of who you are and what you’ve done. And over the past fifty or so years, we’ve all been immensely honored to take the journey with you. Peace and Love – may they be yours, Sir Ringo.

Jude Southerland Kessler is the author of the John Lennon Series: www.johnlennonseries.com


Jude is represented by 910 Public Relations — @910PubRel on Twitter and 910 Public Relations on Facebook.


Live Rubber Soul

With today being the 49th anniversary of the release of Rubber Soul in the UK, we’ve put together “Live Rubber Soul” – the nine Rubber Soul tracks that have been performed live either by the Beatles or solo Beatles.
The Beatles’ decision to retreat full time into the studio after their concert at Candlestick Park in 1966 was a deliberate one. However, as we all know, the group was churning out songs that were either impossible to play live or nearly impossible to duplicate live well before late-1966.
Of the 14 tracks on Rubber Soul, nine have been performed live. Two of the songs were regulars on the Beatles’ set list during their final US tour, five have been performed live by Paul McCartney (solo), one was performed live by George Harrison, and one has been performed live by Ringo Starr (solo).
The songs on Rubber Soul that have never been performed in concert by the Beatles or solo Beatles: Norwegian Wood, Think For Yourself, Girl, Wait, and Run For Your Life.
Drive My Car (Paul McCartney solo)

You Won’t See Me (Paul McCartney Solo — first time since 1965 on record)

Nowhere Man (at the Circus Krone)

The Word (Paul McCartney Solo — first time since 1965 on record)

Michelle (Paul McCartney Solo)

What Goes On (Ringo Starr Solo)

I’m Looking Through You (Paul McCartney Solo)

In My Life (George Harrison Solo in 1974)

If I Needed Someone (Live in Japan)


Beatles Saluted During “The Night That Changed America.”

Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr perform together during last night’s taping of “The Night That Changed America.”

By Danny Abriano
Last night in Los Angeles, CBS taped what will become the Beatles special titled “The Night That Changed America.”  The special will air on February 9th to mark the 50th anniversary of the appearance of The Beatles on the Ed Sullivan show.
A night after they united to perform on stage at the Grammy Awards, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr again took to the stage together – this time to perform Beatles hits.
The two legends had more than a little help from their friends during last night’s star-studded concert.  If you want to be surprised when the special airs, read no further.
Some of the stars who performed at the show were Maroon 5 (“All My Loving”), Alicia Keys and John Legend (“Let It Be”), Imagine Dragons (“Revolution”), Dave Grohl with Jeff Lynne (“Hey Bulldog”), the reunited Eurythmics (“Fool on the Hill”), and Stevie Wonder (“We Can Work It Out”).
As was the case last night, the highlights of the evening were provided by those central to the world of The Beatles.
Dhani Harrison, the son of George, took to the stage to play “Something” with George’s one-time bandmate (Traveling Wilburys) Jeff Lynne.
Ringo Starr performed “Matchbox,” “Boys,” and “Yellow Submarine,” and Paul McCartney performed “Magical Mystery Tour,” “Birthday,” “Get Back,” “I Saw Her Standing There,” and “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.”
Paul and Ringo again performed together, this time belting out “With A Little Help From My Friends” and “Hey Jude” (with Ringo on drums).
“The Night That Changed America” will air on CBS on February 9th.


Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr Rock The Grammy Awards

By Danny Abriano
To recognize the 50th anniversary of the arrival of The Beatles in America, the Grammys made last night’s ceremony a Beatles-centric one, and Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr were the rightful centers of attention.
The two legends were on hand to receive a Lifetime Achievement Award, were seated next to one another in the front row, and both took the stage.
Aside from Paul and Ringo, Yoko Ono, Sean Lennon, and Olivia Harrison were also in attendance. Yoko and Olivia presented an award with Alicia Keys near the end of the ceremony.

The FEST took out a half page ad in last night’s Grammy program book saluting The Beatles.

It was Paul (the winner of five awards last night) and Ringo, though, who were the highlights of the evening.
First, Ringo took to the stage to sing his 1973 hit “Photograph.” Starr and George Harrison co-wrote “Photograph” in 1971, and the pictures of the Fab Four flashing behind Ringo as he performed made for a poignant, moving moment.  The crowd rose in unison as Ringo performed, and it was a truly special scene.
A bit later on, Paul McCartney took to the stage to play “Queenie Eye” from his new album. With Paul playing a piano from the Magical Mystery Tour era, Ringo joined in on drums, creating the surreal and amazing site of the two living Beatles performing together.
The last time the two performed together was in 2010, when Paul surprised Ringo on the occasion of his 70th birthday at Radio City Hall and the two performed “Birthday” together.
Incredibly, last night’s scene may simply serve as an appetizer for Beatles fans who are hungry for more. Tonight, CBS is recording a special titled “The Night That Changed America,” a two hour salute to The Beatles that will air on February 9th at 8PM.
A few days ago, Ringo confirmed that he and Paul would be performing together for the special being filmed tonight. Not to take anything away from the incredible performances we were fortunate to witness last night, but one would imagine Paul and Ringo will be performing Beatles hits together for “The Night That Changed America.”
It was amazing to see Paul and Ringo together last night, and the February 9th special airing on CBS should provide us with more memories that will be long lasting.
Check out a clip of Paul and Ringo performing together last night:


Ringo Confirms Upcoming Performance with Paul

Ringo and Paul perform at Radio City in 2010. Photo by Rob Shanahan.

By Danny Abriano
Ever since it was reported that both Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr will be in attendance at this year’s Grammy awards – and that there would be a special Beatles tribute the night after the Grammy’s, rumors have been swirling that the two would perform together.
Last night, Ringo confirmed to Access Hollywood that the two would be performing together.  According to Ringo, the performance will take place the night after the Grammy’s,  during filming for the CBS special “The Night That Changed America: A Grammys Salute to The Beatles.”
The special, including the performance by Paul and Ringo, will be taped on January 27th, and will air on February 9th – the 50 year anniversary of The Beatles’ earth shattering performance on the Ed Sullivan show.  Said Ringo:

To celebrate the 50 years since we landed in New York in February [1964], they are putting on a big show on Monday and we will be doing it there.

It’s unknown at this point exactly what Paul and Ringo’s performance will entail, but let’s hope it involves Paul at the microphone and Ringo behind his kit – at least for part of the performance.
Paul and Ringo have played together a handful of times since The Beatles broke up in 1970.  The most rollicking one occurred in in July of 2010, when Paul surprised Ringo for his 70th birthday at Radio City.  The crowd went insane, Ringo got on the drums, and Paul belted out “Birthday” with Ringo playing behind him.
Ringo’s photographer Rob Shanahan, who captured the above image of Ringo and Paul at Radio City, will have that photo and other memorable Paul and Ringo photographs, gallery prints and lithographs available for sale in his gallery at this year’s NYC Fest. Check out Rob’s site here.


Happy Birthday Ringo

On the seventh day of the seventh month we celebrate the birthday of the greatest rock and roll drummer of all time.

In what is now a Ringo Birthday tradition, wherever you are at 12 Noon today, hold up a peace signal and say Peace and Love, Peace and Love, Peace and Love.

Keep on Rocking!!


Ringo’s Peace & Love Exhibit – Los Angeles

Our Beatles Expert Tom Frangione on ‘the kit’ at the Grammy Museum in LA

Ringo Starr: Peace & Love
Grammy Museum Los Angeles, CA
Opening June 12, 2013

Field report by NY METRO FEST Discussion Room Host Tom Frangione

“Gonna take a sentimental journey
Gonna set my heart at ease
Gonna make a sentimental journey
To renew old memories”
–          the first verse of the first song on the first solo album by Ringo Starr

In a Beatle-filled summer dominated by Paul McCartney’s “Out There” tour and series of Wings era reissues, Ringo Starr is making headlines of his own.








For starters, he’s bringing his 12th All Starr Band out for an unprecedented 3rd leg of a tour that began in the States last summer and hit the road again at the start of the new year, traveling to Japan and the Pacific rim. In the fall, the current band heads to South America before returning to the States for a two night stand in Las Vegas to wrap things up.


But the big news this summer is the Ringo Starr: Peace & Love celebration now on exhibit at the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles. Not unlike New York’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Annex exhibit dedicated to John Lennon a few years ago, it is a treasure trove of mostly unseen artifacts, media, and interactive exhibits that any Beatles or Ringo fan (count me in for both) will absolutely delight in.


That such a collection was able to be culled together at all is noteworthy, as much of the memorabilia Ringo had kept was destroyed in a 1979 fire at his home. Gathered from storage facilities his handlers managed, and even a few boxes of early mementos Ringo took possession of when his mother died in 1986, the exhibit covers the earliest Liverpool days, through each phase of the Beatles story, his careers as both a solo performer and with the All Starr Band (can they really be approaching their 25h anniversary next year?).


Upon landing in LA, I was struck by the street lamp banners lining every major street in the metropolitan area, including Hollywood Boulevard near the Capitol Records tower at Vine Street, where all four Beatles’ stars now reside on the walk of fame. While the Grammy Museum is home to numerous temporary and permanent exhibits, it was clear from the moment of entry that they rolled out the carpet for Ringo.

In the lobby was a replica Beatles stage set up, with Ludwig drums, an Epiphone guitar and a (gulp! Right handed) Hofner bass which fans are encouraged to use for photo ops. On that note, while the tickets state “no photography”, no such restriction was even remotely enforced on the exhibit floors.


An elevator deposited fans near the Clive Davis theater where a continuous 17-minute loop of video highlights is offered, containing some rarely seen concert and movie footage, as well as snippets of various promo films. (An exit escalator was itself a treat, as a hand painted Beatles/Ringo mural adorned the incline).


A chronology of Ringo’s life and career wraps around the exhibit walls, with a timeline of album releases guiding the way. The Beatles period is represented by two such lines (one each for the UK and US releases), which merge into one as the later years releases come into alignment. The chronology and album timeline continues through to the solo years, but sticks to proper studio releases (don’t look for Scouse the Mouse or any live albums). The center floor contains five huge display cases – one for the Liverpool years, one each for early-mid-and-later years of the Beatles, and one each for the solo and All Starr periods. Among the highlights:
–          Letters from Rory Storm and Brian Epstein;
–          A Rory Storm and the Hurricanes business card;
–          Original stage costumes, including the one from the 1967 Our World broadcast, the 1969 rooftop concert and of course, the Sgt. Pepper robe;
–          The suit Ringo wore for the David Frost Show “Hey Jude” taping;
–          The Goodnight Vienna “spaceman” suit;

Drumheads, posters, handbills, and a host of rare memorabilia flesh out each case. It must be pointed out that any “replica” items are fully designated as such, such as the “antenna” logo drumhead from the early Cavern Club days.

Speaking of drums, three iconic kits are on display (under glass): the Shea/Ed Sullivan kit (with replica drumhead), the later years set as seen in the Let It Be movie and rooftop concert, and a latter day All Starr Band set.

Beyond the movies and music memorabilia, there are sections dedicated to Ringo’s artwork and photography, including his new e-book Photograph, which proved spectacular. I’m old school and prefer my books on paper, thank you very much, but the interactive capacity such as Ringo’s own narration describing some of the shots, was a real treat.

On the topic of things interactive, there is a sing-along booth (amounting to a karaoke version of “Yellow Submarine”, complete with lyrics monitor. First, Ringo is heard on the original Beatles track, then the vocals go away and you take a stab at it. During playback, the on-screen offerings include “play it again” and “make it stop!”.

You say drumming is your madness? Two kits are on display, where fans are encouraged to take a virtual lesson with Ringo, via a computer screen mounted atop the bass drum. My musical DNA is of the six-string variety, but I have to admit it was a total blast!

More of a behind the scenes type? Try your hand at remixing a live version of “With A Little Help From My Friends” at the mini studio.

Elsewhere, a video station with a menu of on-demand career clips is available, as are several listening stations featuring Ringo’s biggest hits. A testimonial video with artists such as Jeff Lynne and Max Weinberg discussing Ringo’s musical legacy is offered as well. Select quotes from key figures in Ringo’s life adorn snare drum heads, tastefully sprinkled throughout the exhibit area. My favorite comes from George Harrison: “Playing without Ringo is like driving a car on three wheels”. Similar testimonials from John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Martin, Jim Keltner, Max Weinberg, DJ Fontana and others round out the set.

Fans should allow 90 minutes to two hours to fully experience the exhibit (and more to see the other museum fare). The only disappointment I found was, of all places, in the gift shop. The only disappointment I found was, of all places, in the gift shop. Discounting a couple of mounted hand-signed drumheads put together by Ringo’s longtime associate, and FEST regular Neal Glaser of Celebrity Art (asking price: $1200 each, with 100% of the proceeds going to Ringo’s charity, the Lotus Foundation), there wasn’t a single item offered that was unique to the exhibit and mentioned it by name. There were Peace & Love t-shirts and other Ringo  garb typical of the merch offered at his concerts, and a selection of Ringo and Beatles CD’s and DVD’s. But if you wanted something with his name and the museum, and didn’t have the aforementioned $1200, you had to settle for a glossy two-sided announcement card, available in the lobby and various music outlets around town.

Fans living in or visiting the in the LA area are encouraged to do whatever it takes to navigate the mind-numbing traffic (ya know it don’t come easy) to experience this Sentimental Journey celebrating your friend and mine, Ringo Starr.

General admission tickets cost $12.95 and are available at the museum box office or by calling 1-888-9-AXS-TIX. The museum is open daily until 7:30pm.  For more information, visit www.grammymuseum.org


Paul & Ringo Meet up in Beverly Hills

Saturday, April 20th, Paul and Nancy McCartney met up with Ringo and Barbara Starr for dinner at Mr. Chow in Beverly Hills. The couples look fabulous as usual and were also joined by Joe Walsh and his wife (Barbara’s sister) and Jeff Lynne. We hope the fans and media gave them the privacy they deserve. With Paul about to start another tour this year and Ringo just completed tour of the Far East and considering another leg of the tour, perhaps in South America, they should have much to talk about. Whatever they discussed, it is always wonderful to know that they get together, as brothers would normally do. Peace and Love.